Monthly Archives: June 2011

ALARMING ASPECTS OF THE NLRB’S CASE AGAINST BOEING: PART 2

If the NLRB should prevail in its suit against Boeing, more than an employer’s right to speak the truth plainly may be in jeopardy.  It is conceivable that an employer’s right to make fundamental decisions, such as where to locate operations, will be curtailed by this Board.  Throughout the complaint, the NLRB’s acting general counsel has requested an order requiring Boeing to operate its second line production of the 787 Dreamliner “in the State of Washington, utilizing supply lines maintained by the [union] in the Seattle, Washington, and Portland, Oregon, area facilities.”

Read More »

ALARMING ASPECTS OF THE NLRB’S CASE AGAINST BOEING: PART 1

Though many employers find the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) to be overly protective of employees, to its credit, the NLRB  has fulfilled its mission of enforcing the National Labor Relations Act in such a way as to maintain a reasonable balance over the past several decades.  A cornerstone concept which made that balance possible is that employers, union representatives, and employees are, with very few exceptions, free to make factual statements without fear of facing charges before the NLRB.  That cornerstone concept is now being threatened.

Read More »

IT MAY DROP A CALL, BUT IT DIDN’T DROP THE BALL

Recently, the Supreme Court of the United States issued an important decision regarding the enforceability of arbitration agreements, and although the case examined the use of those agreements in the consumer context, it has far-reaching implications for their use of in the employment context.

Read More »